A farmer who used a forklift tractor to maneuver a automotive parked on his land was at this time cleared of harmful driving and legal harm after telling the jury, ‘An Englishman’s house is his fort and my fort begins at that entrance gate’. 

Fourth-generation hill farmer Robert Hooper, 57, insisted he had a lawful proper to defend his property, together with his barrister arguing on the premise of a 400-year-old precedent set by the legendary jurist Sir Edward Coke.  

In a ruling generally known as Semayne’s case, Sir Edward established the Widespread Legislation precept that everybody has the proper to make use of cheap power defend their dwelling towards intruders, and – whereas issuing his ruling – uttered the well-known phrase.  

Jurors at this time discovered themselves with the duty of deciding whether or not the identical precept utilized to what occurred in the future in August final 12 months. 

Mr Hooper informed the courtroom he had politely requested a gaggle of males to go away as a result of their automotive was blocking his entrance gate. He mentioned one of many males, apprentice diamond driller Charlie Burns, punched him and he felt he needed to act as a consequence of feeling ‘frightened and threatened’. 

The 21-year-old, from Tyneside, then tried to cease Mr Hooper from flipping his pal’s automotive by flinging himself on the cab of the car and kicking its tyres. After police arrived on the scene, footage – seen by thousands and thousands – reveals Burns muttering ‘f*****g farmers’, earlier than knocking down his trousers and exposing his bottom to the digicam.

As we speak, Mr Hooper’s helps cheered him outdoors Durham Crown Courtroom after a jury cleared him of all fees following a four-day trial.

After the case, his companion, Kate Henderson, learn an announcement which mentioned: ‘The overwhelming help of the area people and other people from afar have saved him going throughout these final eight months of hell. We welcome the jury’s verdict and are grateful for it.’  

Robert Hooper, 57, embracing his partner Kate Henderson outside Durham Crown Court after being cleared of dangerous driving and criminal damage

Robert Hooper, 57, embracing his companion Kate Henderson outdoors Durham Crown Courtroom after being cleared of harmful driving and legal harm

Charlie Burns (left) and Elliot Johnson (right) had arrived on Mr Hooper's land after visiting a nearby waterfall

Charlie Burns (left) and Elliot Johnson (proper) had arrived on Mr Hooper’s land after visiting a close-by waterfall 

Mr Hooper told the jury: 'An Englishman's home is his castle and my castle starts at that front gate'

Mr Hooper informed the jury: ‘An Englishman’s house is his fort and my fort begins at that entrance gate’

Video of the moment Mr Hooper tipped the car over a low wall onto the road

Video of the second Mr Hooper tipped the automotive over a low wall onto the highway 

Burns pulled down his shorts and mooned at police who were responding to the incident

Burns pulled down his shorts and mooned at police who were responding to the incident

Burns pulled down his shorts and mooned at police who had been responding to the incident  

Historic case that led decide to utter immortal phrase ‘an Englishman’s house is his fort’ 

In 1604, Sir Edward Coke – then Lawyer Normal of England and sitting within the King’s Bench – was requested to cross judgment in a case that grew to become well-known world wide. 

Richard Gresham and George Berisford had been joint tenants of a home in Blackfriars, London. Berisford died whereas in debt to Peter Semayne. Semayne then secured a civil writ of attachment on Berisford’s items, which had been situated inside the home.

After the Sheriff of London was denied entry by Gresham, the sheriff provided to interrupt and enter into the home. As an alternative, Semayne sued, bringing an motion on the case towards Gresham for his losses.

Sir Edward dominated that – as a consequence of it being a civil situation somewhat than a legal one – the sheriff ought to have requested for permission to enter the home somewhat than breaking in. 

He additionally dominated that it was not a felony for a home-owner or tenant to injure somebody attempting to interrupt into their dwelling, saying: ‘If theeves come to a mans home to rob him, or homicide, and the proprietor or his servants kill any of the theeves in defence of himself and his home, it’s no felony, and he shall lose nothing.’

In the USA, this established the precedent for the so-called ‘knock and announce rule’, which requires police to announce their presence and supply residents with a possibility to open the door previous to a search. 

Cell phone footage confirmed how Mr Hooper used a telehandler with forks to elevate the £16,000 automotive from the lane outdoors his farm in Newbiggin-in-Teesdale, County Durham, flip it, and push in on to its aspect on the highway outdoors.

A shirtless Charlie Burns, who had been visiting the realm that day and had drunk as much as seven bottles of lager, was knocked to the ground by the car’s lifting forks.

Mr Hooper had informed the jury he was punched by Mr Burns when he first politely requested the boys to go away as they had been blocking entry on what was a busy day on the farm.

He informed the courtroom he was conscious of an ‘inflow’ of youths visiting the realm that summer season, inflicting anti-social behaviour, littering and damaging partitions. 

The farmer claimed the youthful man punched him twice within the farm buggy he was driving, bursting his lip.

Mr Hooper informed the courtroom: ‘I assumed it’s time to get out of there, and I mentioned ‘In the event you do not transfer it, I’ll’.

‘My thoughts was racing.

‘I assumed we now have a little bit of an issue right here, there’s two of them, half my age, I did not know what they’d when it comes to weapons, or what they had been able to doing.

‘I assumed if the automotive was off the property, that might be them off the property, out of the way in which.’

Mr Hooper mentioned he was defending his property and himself.

He mentioned: ‘I felt threatened and an Englishman’s house is his fort, and my fort begins at that entrance gate.’ 

Requested by defence barrister Michael Rawlinson why he didn’t merely name the police, Hooper replied: ‘I’ve had fairly a variety of burglaries on the farm through the years, about eight in complete.

‘We’ve not had the perfect response from the police and there was not time for anybody to be coming I didn’t suppose.

‘There’s an unmanned police station at Barnard Fortress about 15 miles away and the subsequent one is at Shildon and it could take an hour to get there from Shildon.’ 

Mr Hooper, a fourth-generation hill farmer, defended his home and property by flipping the car off his land

Mr Hooper, a fourth-generation hill farmer, defended his dwelling and property by flipping the automotive off his land

In his closing speech to the jury, Michael Rawlinson, defending, gave the origin of the saying, referring again to the decide Sir Edward Coke’s feedback which set authorized precedents in 1604.

Referring to arguments about how Mr Hooper may have acted in a different way that day, Mr Rawlinson additionally quoted the boxer Mike Tyson, saying: ‘Everybody has a plan till they get punched within the mouth.’

Mr Hooper, who has no earlier convictions, had a busy day baling silage and had gone again to the farm for his tea, meaning to exit once more to hold on working. 

Mr Burns had been consuming with associates at Low Power waterfall, and having consumed as much as seven bottles of lager he was meaning to stroll 52 miles again to South Tyneside.

He informed the jury he noticed his pal Elliott Johnson whose Corsa had suffered a double puncture, which was why they parked on the farmer’s lane.

In his closing remarks, David Ward, prosecuting, informed the jury the Crown was not saying Mr Hooper was a ‘thug’, however that his actions had been ‘completely irrational’ on the day.

Choose Ray Singh had outlined routes to verdict for the jury, explaining the regulation surrounding self-defence and a defendant defending himself and his property.   

Video grab image dated June 2021 issued by the CPS from video played at Durham Crown Court showing farmer Robert Hooper using a farm vehicle to remove a Vauxhall Corsa from his land last June

Video grab image dated June 2021 issued by the CPS from video played at Durham Crown Court showing farmer Robert Hooper using a farm vehicle to remove a Vauxhall Corsa from his land last June

Video seize picture dated June 2021 issued by the CPS from video performed at Durham Crown Courtroom exhibiting Hooper utilizing a farm car to take away a Vauxhall Corsa from his land final June

Hooper told the jury he 'definitely' did not mean to strike Mr Burns with the vehicle's forks

Hooper informed the jury he ‘positively’ didn’t imply to strike Mr Burns with the car’s forks



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